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Report Summarizes Current State of Knowledge Ocean Acidification Research

Marine organisms that build lime shells suffer under ocean acidification.
(Photo Credit: Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research)

Never before have so many scientists conducted research on what impacts the declining pH value of seawater has on animals and plants in the ocean—until now. The experts have compiled their results for the second report on ocean acidification of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD). Major focus is placed on the consequences that also have an effect on humans. By means of this summary, the CBD wants to put the problem of the acidifying oceans on the international political agenda. The authors of the new report include scientists of the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI).

One of their major findings is that acidic water not only harms the calcareous shells and skeletons of mussels and corals, but may also affect more highly developed ocean dwellers like fish. Moreover, every species reacts to acidic water very differently and some even profit from it, such as seagrasses that utilize the additional carbon dioxide for photosynthesis.

Press Release

Source: Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research press release





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