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March 2015 Issue

25 Years Ago 1990. William W. Fox Jr. was tapped to head the National Marine Fisheries Service. From 1972 to 1982, Fox served with NOAA as chief of the Oceanic Fisheries Resources Division and director of the agency’s Southeast Fisheries Center in Miami. ... The National Science Foundation, which manages the United States Antarctic Program, issued a unified plan for implementing recommendations made by the foundation’s Office of the General Counsel to bring U.S. activities into compliance with environmental law. ... A large geological fault was mapped on the ocean floor 70 miles off the Oregon coast by Oregon State University scientists.

15 Years Ago 2000. The Coral Reef Task Force unveiled the first National Action Plan to comprehensively and aggressively address the most pressing challenges facing coral reefs. ... NOAA’s Aquarius began its 2000 mission season as part of the educational Jason XI project. Scientists showed students what it was like to live and work in space and underwater. ... One of the most ambitious federal science initiatives in the information age, the Networking and Information Research & Development Act, passed the U.S. House of Representatives in mid-February. Passage nearly doubled federal information technology research for five years.

10 Years Ago 2005. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and NOAA agreed to work together to help U.S. coastal communities grow in ways that benefit the American economy, public health and the environment. The partnership was formalized with the signing of a Memorandum of Agreement. ... The U.S. Navy published a new UUV master plan, the first since 2000. The plan served as a guide for the continued evolution of UUV technologies. ... A panel of expert witnesses told the U.S. House of Representatives Science Committee that the United States is vulnerable to a major tsunami. Limited detection capabilities in the Pacific and Atlantic was cited as a concern.


2015:  JAN | FEB | MARCH
2014:  JAN | FEB | MARCH | APRIL | MAY | JUNE | JULY | AUG | SEPT | OCT | NOV | DEC

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Sea Technology is read worldwide in more than 110 countries by management, engineers, scientists and technical personnel working in industry, government and educational research institutions. Readers are involved with oceanographic research, fisheries management, offshore oil and gas exploration and production, undersea defense including antisubmarine warfare, ocean mining and commercial diving.