Home | Contact ST  
Follow ST



Marine Resources

2016:  JAN | FEB | MARCH | APRIL | MAY | JUNE | JULY | AUG | SEPT | OCT
2015:  JAN | FEB | MARCH | APRIL | MAY | JUNE | JULY | AUG | SEPT | OCT | NOV | DEC

October 2016 Issue


Survey of Coral
Bleaching in Maldives

Preliminary findings of a comprehensive scientific survey examining the impact of the climate change—related 2016 mass bleaching in the Maldives indicate that all reefs surveyed were affected by the event. Approximately 60 percent of all coral colonies assessed—and up to 90 percent in some sites—were bleached.

Higher than average sea surface water temperatures, linked to an El Niño Southern Oscillation Event, have caused mass coral bleaching around the world in 2016.

The survey was conducted by the Maldives Marine Research Center (MRC) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in partnership with the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN).

A national monitoring program has been developed by MRC and IUCN to evaluate recovery of reefs across the country.


Marine Fish Inventory
For Chukchi, Beaufort

A new report by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management describes 109 marine fish species from the Chukchi and Beaufort seas. The updated marine fish inventory includes 20 newly confirmed species and 104 new descriptions. The study area includes U.S. marine waters to the north of the Bering Strait.

Alaska’s rapidly changing climate is affecting ecology and economic opportunities in the Arctic. Hospitable marine habitats are developing in warming Arctic waters, and previously ice-covered areas are becoming accessible.

BOEM requested the research to update information it uses to evaluate possible environmental effects of offshore oil and gas development.

The research was conducted by the USGS and University of California Santa Barbara and will be useful in directing future research needs and informing natural resource managers about high-priority marine fish species.


Stress Study of
Salmon Sharks

A Mote Marine Lab researcher and colleagues tagged four salmon sharks this summer off Alaska to conduct the first assessment of fishing-induced stress for this species.

Salmon sharks have been fished recreationally in Alaskan waters for more than a decade. Though no population assessments have been done for salmon sharks, they have faced increasing pressure from anglers who catch the daily limit of one salmon shark per person and release the rest. It is unknown how many salmon sharks survive the stress of capture and release.

Researchers fitted four mature female salmon sharks with High Rate X-Tags programmed to stay on the shark for 30 days and then detach, float to the surface and transmit their data via satellites, including depth and water temperature. Researchers analyze the depth data to infer whether a released shark has survived. They took blood samples to examine for chemical compounds indicating stress.


Simulation Shows
Possible Ocean on Venus

Venus may have had a shallow liquid-water ocean and habitable surface temperatures for up to 2 billion years of its early history, according to computer modeling of the planet’s ancient climate by scientists at NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS). The simulation is similar to the type used to predict future climate change on Earth.

Scientists long have theorized that Venus formed out of ingredients similar to Earth’s, but followed a different evolutionary path. Measurements by NASA’s Pioneer mission to Venus in the 1980s first suggested Venus originally may have had an ocean. However, Venus is closer to the sun than Earth and receives far more sunlight. As a result, the planet’s early ocean evaporated, water vapor molecules were broken apart by ultraviolet radiation, and hydrogen escaped to space. With no water left on the surface, carbon dioxide built up in the atmosphere, leading to a runaway greenhouse effect that created present conditions.

GISS simulated conditions of a hypothetical early Venus with an atmosphere similar to Earth’s, a day as long as Venus’s current day, and a shallow ocean consistent with early data from the Pioneer spacecraft. The simulation involved sunlight that warms the surface and produces rain that creates a thick layer of clouds, which acts like an umbrella to shield the surface from much of the solar heating. The result is mean climate temperatures that are a few degrees cooler than Earth’s today.

The findings affect future NASA missions that will try to detect possible habitable planets.


L2P2 Website Supports
Decom Operations

Decom North Sea, the representative body for the offshore decommissioning industry, launched the Late Life Planning Portal (L2P2) website at http://decomnorthsea.com/l2p2 to support the North Sea oil and gas industry in the planning and execution of late-life and decommissioning projects. It provides a single access point for knowledge sharing and cross-sector learning and is designed to bring regulators, operators and the supply chain together to create a cooperative environment.

L2P2 is a repository for lessons learned, a forum for discussion and a gateway to contacts, analytics and market intelligence.

About 90 percent of North Sea assets have yet to be decommissioned.


Stones Starts
Production in Gulf

Production has started from Shell’s Stones development in the Gulf of Mexico, expected to produce around 50,000 barrels of oil equivalent per day (boe/d) when fully ramped up at the end of 2017.

The host facility for the world’s deepest offshore oil and gas project is an FPSO vessel that produces through subsea infrastructure beneath 9,500 ft. of water.

Shell’s global deepwater business currently produces 600,000 boe/d and is expected to increase to more than 900,000 boe/d by the early 2020s from established reservoirs. Three other Shell-operated projects are currently under construction or in preproduction commissioning: Coulomb Phase 2 and Appomattox in the Gulf of Mexico and Malikai in Malaysia.


2016:  JAN | FEB | MARCH | APRIL | MAY | JUNE | JULY | AUG | SEPT | OCT
2015:  JAN | FEB | MARCH | APRIL | MAY | JUNE | JULY | AUG | SEPT | OCT | NOV | DEC


-back to top-

Sea Technology is read worldwide in more than 110 countries by management, engineers, scientists and technical personnel working in industry, government and educational research institutions. Readers are involved with oceanographic research, fisheries management, offshore oil and gas exploration and production, undersea defense including antisubmarine warfare, ocean mining and commercial diving.