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Marine Electronics

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April 2012 Issue

Netherlands Navy Completes Successful Testing of HPD
The Royal Netherlands Navy has successfully executed the final tests of its System for Hydrographic Information Processes—Part 2 (SHIP2) project. SHIP2 will provide source and bathymetric data management, with paper charts and digital products, and geospatial Web-publishing capabilities for the Netherlands Hydrographic Office.

CARIS (Fredericton, Canada), which is under contract for SHIP2 and announced test completion in March, will provide components from its Ping-to-Chart workflow, including the Bathy DataBASE for bathymetric data management and the Hydrographic Production Database (HPD) for INT1 paper charts (which follow the International Hydrographic Organization’s standard list of symbols, abbreviations and terms), electronic navigation charts and arc macro languages. The HPD, which is the core of SHIP2’s architecture, will also produce notices to mariners and other publications.

The HPD underwent a user acceptance test and a site acceptance test.

Support for existing data has been fully maintained. Test conversions of existing databases were done to migrate all the data to the new system.


EM Array Used to Find Possible Amityville Murder Weapon
By using a towed electromagnetic (EM) array, Aqua Survey Inc. (Flemington, New Jersey) located and recovered at the bottom of a canal in Amityville, New York, a handgun matching the description of a lost murder weapon from the 1974 DeFeo family slayings, the company announced in March.

Aqua Survey was contracted by Ryan Katzenbach of Katco Media, who had been researching the mass murder in Amityville for his documentary titled, “Shattered Hopes: The True Story of the Amityville Murders.” At the time of the murders, police had recovered one weapon, but Katzenbach wanted to locate a suspected second murder weapon from the Amityville murders. He called Aqua Survey to perform an EM survey of a section of canal near the scene of the murders where he thought the second weapon may have been discarded.

Towing an EM array behind one of its vessels, Aqua Survey detected 317 metallic objects in the survey area and charted their locations with a survey-grade digital GPS. The team narrowed the possibilities down to a handful of targets to be investigated. An EM probe was then hand-pushed into the sediment to further pinpoint each object. Divers used the probe in up to 4 feet of soft mud to reach the targets.

Upon diving on the third target, a volunteer diver from the Long Island Diver’s Association found the remains of the trigger/receiver section of a top-break revolver, seemingly of .38 caliber. The gun, which had been buried under 3 feet of mud, was bagged and tagged by the Suffolk County police, who supervised the recovery.

“Suffolk County police on site at the time of the discovery took possession of the weapon to perform forensic testing,” Aqua Survey’s manager of marine operations, Mark Padover, said. “If found to be a match, the find potentially challenges the traditionally accepted story of the Amityville murders and sheds new light on what may have actually happened to the DeFeo family.” Click here for more information.


MaXccess Personnel-Transfer Platform Completes Sea Trials
Offshore trials of OSBIT Power Ltd.’s (Riding Mill, England) offshore wind turbine access system, MaXccess, have been successfully completed at the Hywind demo floating wind turbine offshore Norway with the support of Siemens Wind Power (Erlangen, Germany) and Statoil (Stavanger, Norway), the companies announced in March. MaXccess provides a stable base from which personnel can transfer to and from boat landing platforms mounted on turbine foundation structures.

MaXccess was installed on Bayard 3, the wind farm service vessel operated by Fred. Olsen Windcarrier AS (Oslo, Norway). Offshore operations lasted nine days, during which more than 100 connections were made, with MaXccess being clamped to the turbine buffer tube for a total of more than 12 hours. Thirty-six personnel transfers were made. During trials, the MaXccess system reliably operated in 1.9 meters significant wave-height conditions.

Technology for personnel-transfer safety near- and offshore has thus far been limited by wave conditions, which can cause construction delays and service and maintenance interruptions, resulting in increased costs and lost revenue.

“It is vital that the industry supports innovations that have the potential to bring the cost of electricity down and increase safety of personnel working offshore,” Anders Wikborg, Statoil’s marine operations manager for offshore wind energy, said. Click here for more information.


Holland Purchases Inspection System to Monitor Ship Lanes
Holland’s survey department, Rijks­waterstaat (RWS), which is the executive arm of the Dutch Ministry of Infrastructure and the Environment, has received an integrated Underwater Inspection System (UIS) from Coda­Octopus Products Ltd. (Edinburgh, Scotland), the company announced in March.

Purchased through Nautikaris BV (IJmuiden, Holland), the delivery included commissioning, sea acceptance tests and training onboard the survey vessel MV Houtvliet, all completed by the end of January.

The UIS has CodaOctopus’ Echoscope real-time 3D sonar. RWS division Data ICT Dienst, which bought the system, previously did a trial and evaluation of the Echoscope before making a decision. The RWS will use the system for a range of marine applications, including minimum clearance investigations above shipwreck sites around shipping channels.

Echoscope can hit smaller targets, such as protruding shipwreck masts or objects on the seafloor, with 20 to 30 more pings than other multibeam sonars.


2013:  JAN | FEB | MARCH | APRIL | MAY | JUNE | JULY | AUG | SEPT | OCT | NOV | DEC
2012:  JAN | FEB | MARCH | APRIL | MAY | JUNE | JULY | AUG | SEPT | OCT | NOV | DEC

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